2021 Virtual Hoop Dance Contest | Heard Museum
ADVANCING AMERICAN INDIAN ART

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2021 Virtual Hoop Dance Contest

An online celebration of artistry, sheer athleticism, and cultural traditions

The Heard Museum Virtual Hoop Dance Contest will be presented as a prerecorded online event on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2021. Check this page, or visit us on social media for continued updates.

Contest Rules

These Rules have been developed with input from the Hoop staff and Advisors to the program (Advisors and staff are listed on the Rules document). Please read the rules carefully, and direct any questions to: hoopdance@heard.org.
Heard Museum Hoop Dance Contest 2021 Rules

Contestant Information

In order to compete, you must fully complete your online registration by January 11 at 11:59pm Arizona-Time. We strongly encourage you to register early. Registration will open on Tuesday, December 8th. You may register online by clicking here or via the “Register to Compete” button in the sidebar.

Once registered, your registration materials will be verified within three (3) business days. Upon verification, you will receive a confirmation email at the address you provide which will contain further information about preparing and submitting your video.

Video submissions for each contestant must be received according to the guidelines outlined in the Rules no later than January 18, 2021 at 11:59pm Arizona-time.

Prizes

YouthTeenAdultSenior
1st $3501st $7501st $25001st $1500
2nd $2002nd $5002nd $15002nd $1000
3rd $1503rd $3503rd $10003rd $500
A cash prize of $250 in each age division will also be awarded for a “Viewer’s Choice.” Online voting will take place the week prior to the virtual event. Further details on voting will be announced.

ABOUT HOOP DANCING

Hoop dancing is a long-standing tradition in many Native cultures. The art of hoop dance honors the cultural traditions from multiple Indigenous communities that first employed hoop dance as a healing ceremony. Today, hoop dance is shared as an artistic expression to celebrate and honor Indigenous traditions throughout the U.S. and Canada.

This unique dance can involve the use of more than 50 hoops. Passed down from one generation to the next, hoop dancing communicates individual and tribal stories using hoops to create symbols and depict animals of great meaning in Native communities. The continuous circle of the hoops symbolizes the circle of life and the continual changing of the seasons.

Traditional hoops were made from the wood of a willow tree. Modern-day hoops are often made from reed and plastic hose because of the durability of the material when traveling. The hoops are decorated with tape and paint to symbolize the changing colors of each season. The traditional wooden hoops are still used on rare occasions.

The art of hoop dance honors the cultural traditions from multiple Indigenous communities that first employed hoop dance as a healing ceremony. Today, hoop dance is shared as an artistic expression to celebrate and honor Indigenous traditions throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Dancers are judged on a slate of five skills: precision, timing/rhythm, showmanship, creativity, and speed. Contestants compete in one of five divisions: Tiny Tots (age 5 and younger), Youth (6-12), Teen (13-17), Adult (18-39) and Senior (40 and older). See the contest rules for further detail.


2020 Winners

Adult (18-39)

World Adult Champion:Scott Sixkiller-Sinquah (Gila River Pima, Hopi)
2nd Place: Tyrese Jensen (Diné, Pima Maricopa)
3rd Place: James Jones (Tallcree First Nation)
4th Place: Sampson Sixkiller-Sinquah (Gila River Pima, Hopi, Cherokee)
5th Place: Talon Duncan (San Carlos, Apache, Arikara/Hidastsa/Mandan)
6th Place: Patrick Willie (Diné)

Senior (40 and above)

World Senior Champion:Moontee Sinquah (Hopi, Tewa, Choctaw)
Second Place:Lisa Odjig (Obijwe, Odawa, Pottawatomi)
Third Place:Terry Goedel (Yakama)

Teens (13-17)

World Teen Champion:Nedallas Hammill (Diné)
Second Place:Josiah Enriquez (Pueblo of Pojaque)
Third Place:Joseph Romero (Pueblo of Pojaque/Nambé)

Youth (6-12)

World Youth Champion:Kailayne Jensen (Diné)
Second Place:Isaiah George (Santa Clara Pueblo)
Third Place: JaiP’o Harvier (Pueblo of Pojoaque) #


Questions?

Get in touch via contact@heard.org for general inquiries.
Email tvigil@heard.org for PR/Media requests.


Support for this program provided by:
Albertsons and Safeway Foundation
Lightning Boy Foundation


Hoop Dancing logo. 3 hoops in a star pattern with a feather in the middle


Event Details

Saturday, February 13

Location:
Virtual

Event Category:
, , ,

Event will be streamed via the Heard Museum's Facebook and YouTube channels.

Showtime TBA.

REGISTER TO COMPETE