A TURNING POINT:  NAVAJO WEAVING IN THE LATE 20th CENTURY
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This exhibit features the contemporary art of two dozen Navajo weavers, working from the 1960s into the 1990s. Their handwoven textiles reflect Navajo culture and its dynamic balance between tradition and change.


These rugs and tapestries also express individual intent, as each artist has created a one-of-a-kind piece.

The "Turning Point" in our title refers to a broad cultural shift, not to any specific event. In the late 20th century, Navajo weavers began to self-identify as artists and explore new aesthetic expressions. Urban galleries started to display Navajo weaving as fine art. Collectors grew aware of the work's beauty and value. Art museums exhibited and published the textiles. All four groups weavers, dealers, collectors and museums consider Navajo rugs and tapestries as Art.

These handwoven textiles belong to The Santa Fe Collection, consisting of more than 70 rugs and tapestries acquired by Dr. and Mrs. Charles Rimmer, who admired
contemporary Navajo weaving above paintings or sculpture. The Rimmers have given their collection to the Heard Museum in an act of generosity, adding immeasurably to
the museum's ability to present the best of Navajo weaving.

 

 

The Heard Museum A TURNING POINT:  NAVAJO WEAVING IN THE LATE 20th CENTURY