Meet the Authors at Books & More

The museum's Books & More shop brings in noted authors on American Indian art, history and the southwest every year. Meet the artists and have them autograph your books!

Saturday, March 2
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Nancy Bo Flood
First Laugh, Welcome Baby!

Award-winning children’s book author Nancy Bo Flood was a research psychologist and studied brain development at the University of Minnesota and as a post-doctoral scientist at the University of London. Her work has always focused on children and young adults – as a researcher, counselor, teacher, parent, and now as a writer. Her work and research has allowed her to live all over the world – in Malawi, Africa, Hawaii, Japan, the western Pacific, and, most recently, the Navajo Nation where she hikes, rides her bike and attends local rodeos. Flood coauthored the book with Rose Tahe (Dine') and illustrator Johnathan Nelson (Dine'). The First Laugh Ceremony is a celebration held to welcome a new member of the community. +As everyone—from Baby's nima (mom) to nadi (big sister) to cheii (grandfather)—tries to elicit the joyous sound from Baby, readers are introduced to details about Navajo life and the Navajo names for family members.

Carol Hageman
Bubby's Puddle Pond: A Tortuga's Tale of the Desert

Inspired by her lifelong love of wildlife and the outdoors, first-time author, Carol Hageman has written a book that’s enjoyable for children up to third grade. Based loosely on animal behavior Hageman observed in real life, Bubby’s Puddle Pond: A Tortuga’s Tale of the Desert, is a fun and entertaining story of a young desert tortoise and the friends he makes in his habitat. They learn lessons in sharing, friendship and trust. In addition, the book offers educational resources, facts about the desert tortoise, glossary of words, and curriculum guide for educators. Part of the proceeds of this book supports the Arizona Game & Fish Department, Tortoise Adoption Program.
https://ninastorybooks.com/

Jim Turner
Four Corners USA: Wonders of the American Southwest

Jim Turner has been researching and teaching Arizona history for more than forty years. He retired as Arizona Historical Society historian in 2009 to write Arizona: A Celebration of the Grand Canyon State He is currently an author and editor for Rio Nuevo Publishers. Jim also teaches Arizona history for Roads Scholars (formerly Elderhostel), is a presenter for the Arizona Humanities, and gives regular presentations at senior retirement communities.

The “Four Corners” describes the region within 150 miles of where the Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico borders intersect. Anne Hillerman calls this “a beautiful and important book, packed to the brim with historical insights, useful tidbits for travelers, and, best of all, a profound appreciation for this unique part of America’s West. The stunning photographs dramatically reflect the majesty and mystery of this unusual landscape and the resilient people who call it home. This is a volume to savor from your armchair or to inspire a trip to see these places first hand.”

Saturday, March 2
12 – 2 p.m.


Paula Baxter
Pueblo Bead Jewelry: Living Design

Baxter is a professor of humanities at Berkeley College in Westchester County, New York. Previously an art librarian and curator at a major New York City cultural institution for twenty-two years, Baxter is a practicing design historian. Her book addresses the vital role the bead played in Pueblo Indian jewelry design and its influence in modernist American design. Baxter integrates decades of her research with updated findings along with more than 250 images.

Tyrone Campbell
Navajo Pictorial Weaving 1880-1950, 2nd edition

Campbell has been a noted author, lecturer and dealer in antique American Indian art for 45 years. His specialty is Navajo and Pueblo weavings. He has published seven books and museum catalogs, been guest curator at major museums across the country and lectured at major museums and universities. All categories of antique Navajo pictorial weaving are covered along with 92 new images of weavings discovered in the last three decades, many never before published or exhibited. Through these nearly 300 photos and short texts, both the novice and advanced collector can reach a better understanding of the enigmatic and unusual body of Navajo pictorial weaving. This treasury reemphasizes that Navajo pictorial weaving is a truly American folk art.

Marshall Trimble
Arizona Oddities: Land of Anomalies & Tamales

Award-winning author Marshall Trimble, Arizona’s Official State Historian, grew up in the small railroad town of Ash Fork on storied Route 66 during the years following World War II. He’s also a “cowboy philosopher,” educator, lecturer, folk singer and stage performer. He taught Arizona history at Scottsdale Community College for forty years. He has written more than twenty books and been inducted into several halls of fame, including the Arizona Veteran’s Hall of Fame and the Arizona Music and Entertainment Hall of Fame. Arizona has stories as peculiar as its stunning landscapes. Trimble unearths these and other amusing anomalies, outstanding obscurities and compelling curiosities in the state's history.

Saturday, March 2
2 – 4 p.m.


Peter Hiller and Ann Lane Hedlund
Navajo Weavers of the American Southwest

Retired art educator Peter Hiller has collected native cultural materials since his youth. This volume is comprised primarily of his vintage postcards, photographs, and select artworks. Hill curates the Jo Mora Trust Collection and resides in Carmel, CA.

Ann Hedlund was Curator of Ethnology and Professor of Anthropology at the Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona, from 1997 to 2013. She is the author of many publications and has curated numerous exhibitions of Native American art. Her book, Navajo Weaving in the Late Twentieth Century: Kin, Community, and Collectors (2004) received the Arizona Highways/Arizona Library Association Award for Non-Fiction. A frequent consultant at the Heard, she presented at the Heard’s 2017 for “Prepare for the Fair” lecture series.

https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Products/9781467129725

Billie Hougart
Hallmarks series

Hougart had a long career in national science policy including service in the legislative and executive branches of the U.S. government, as well as in the private sector. His hallmark reference books are indispensable resources to fans and collectors of silver jewelry and silver objects. His education and career in science instilled the curiosity, discipline and focus necessary to doing the research to compile the data needed to write these hallmark reference books.

David Shultz
Baskets of Time: Profiles of Maine Indian Basket Makers

David Shultz is owner of Home & Away Native Arts in Kennebunkport, Maine which has represented artists from many tribes and nations across North America since 2002. The mission is to promote living Native artists and to help keep cultural arts alive as they evolve into 21st century manifestations of ancient traditions. The traditions include jewelry, sculpture, bead work, prints, baskets, and wood carvings. David published Baskets of Time: Profiles of Maine Indian Basket Makers in 2017. It includes artists’ thoughts about the centuries old tradition of basket making among the Wabanaki people of Maine, including their own roles in this culturally important work. This beautifully produced book has been well accepted not only among collectors of Maine Indian baskets, but also among the basket makers themselves. It also serves as a comprehensive introduction to those who are new to the field.

A native of Puerto Rico, David serves on the board of directors of two Maine non-profit organizations: Community Health Options, and Marine Mammals of Maine. He also serves as a Spanish interpreter for Central American refugees in the South Texas Family Residential System in Dilley Texas.

Sunday, March 3
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.


Peter Hiller
Navajo Weavers of the American Southwest

Retired art educator Peter Hiller has collected native cultural materials since his youth. This volume is comprised primarily of his vintage postcards, photographs, and select artworks. Hill curates the Jo Mora Trust Collection and resides in Carmel, CA.

Jim Turner
Four Corners USA: Wonders of the American Southwest

Jim Turner has been researching and teaching Arizona history for more than forty years. He retired as Arizona Historical Society historian in 2009 to write Arizona: A Celebration of the Grand Canyon State He is currently an author and editor for Rio Nuevo Publishers. Jim also teaches Arizona history for Roads Scholars (formerly Elderhostel), is a presenter for the Arizona Humanities, and gives regular presentations at senior retirement communities.

The “Four Corners” describes the region within 150 miles of where the Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico borders intersect. Anne Hillerman calls this “a beautiful and important book, packed to the brim with historical insights, useful tidbits for travelers, and, best of all, a profound appreciation for this unique part of America’s West. The stunning photographs dramatically reflect the majesty and mystery of this unusual landscape and the resilient people who call it home. This is a volume to savor from your armchair or to inspire a trip to see these places first hand.”

Sunday, March 3
12 – 2 p.m.


Paula Baxter
Pueblo Bead Jewelry

Baxter is a professor of humanities at Berkeley College in Westchester County, New York. Previously an art librarian and curator at a major New York City cultural institution for twenty-two years, Baxter is a practicing design historian. Her book addresses the vital role the bead played in Pueblo Indian jewelry design and its influence in modernist American design. Baxter integrates decades of her research with updated findings along with more than 250 images.

Tyrone Campbell
Navajo Pictorial Weaving 1880-1950, 2nd edition

Campbell has been a noted author, lecturer and dealer in antique American Indian art for 45 years. His specialty is Navajo and Pueblo weavings. He has published seven books and museum catalogs, been guest curator at major museums across the country and lectured at major museums and universities. All categories of antique Navajo pictorial weaving are covered along with 92 new images of weavings discovered in the last three decades, many never before published or exhibited. Through these nearly 300 photos and short texts, both the novice and advanced collector can reach a better understanding of the enigmatic and unusual body of Navajo pictorial weaving. This treasury reemphasizes that Navajo pictorial weaving is a truly American folk art.

Billie Hougart
Hallmark Series

Hougart had a long career in national science policy including service in the legislative and executive branches of the U.S. government, as well as in the private sector. His hallmark reference books are indispensable resources to fans and collectors of silver jewelry and silver objects. His education and career in science instilled the curiosity, discipline and focus necessary to doing the research to compile the data needed to write these hallmark reference books.

Susan Tatterson
Abandoned Arizona: Ghost Towns and Legends

Tatterson is a professor of digital photography at Central Arizona College. Originally from Australia, she became fascinated with abandoned locations while working on her thesis for a master’s degree in fine arts at the University of Baltimore. She visited 20 locations around Arizona before deciding on eleven, including Phoenix Trotting Park, Route 66 Trading Posts and Ruby.