Las Favoritas de Frida: Selections from the Heard Collection

What would Frida Kahlo wear? What kinds of folk art would she surround herself with? To answer those questions, the Heard went to the Phoenix Fridas. This collective of nine artists founded a decade ago draw inspiration by Frida Kahlo’s life, work and attitude toward life. The Fridas worked with the Heard to select items from the museum's substantial collection of Mexican art and provide explanations of why they think Frida would like the items they selected. We discovered treasures that look like they were pulled straight from Frida Kahlo’s closet — colorfully embroidered blouses, large stone necklaces, shawls (rebozos) and ornate jewelry with beads and coins. Other works of art might be found on her bedside table, bookshelf or wall — a lively tree of life, ceramic animal figures, copper and wood masks, and vibrant textiles. Frida loved her animals, making pets of small deer, Mexican hairless dogs, parrots and monkeys. We have selected some figurines from our collection that are irresistible. The Fridas examined items from among more than 400 pieces of Mexican art purchased for the Heard in 1979 by the Friends of Mexican Art (FOMA), an organization that promotes the appreciation of Mexican art through sponsoring exhibits, lectures, art purchases and other activities that encourage the friendship and understanding between the peoples of Arizona and Mexico. Interviews with each member of the Phoenix Fridas are included in a 30-minute video about who they are, their art and their inspiration. It will be screened in the gallery during the exhibit. These artsy ladies will also assist with exhibit-related programs presented at the Heard. [caption id="attachment_5031" align="alignleft" width="500"]Photograph of the members of the Phoenix Fridas Members of The Phoenix Fridas. Left to right: Emily Costello (aka Smoking Frida), Anita Mabante Leach (aka Panchita Frida), Kathy Murillo (aka Crafty Chica), Carmen Guerrero (aka Beader Frida) and Annalisa Serna (aka Fashionista Frida). Behind:  Veronica Verdugo Lomeli (aka Vero Frida), Monica Gisel (no aka yet, she is the newest member of the group), Gloria Casillas-Martinez (aka Glorious Frida) and Monique Mata (aka Muchacha Frida).[/caption]

Recommended Reading

Heard Museum Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives librarian Betty Murphy, with curator Janet Cantley and Books & More Manager Lynn Bullock, have compiled a bibliography of recommended titles to learn more about Frida Kahlo and her culture. Download the reading list here.  


Gifted! Recent Additions to the Heard Collection

December 19, 2015 - May 1, 2016

The Heard Museum’s permanent collection is at the heart of its exhibits and programs. Gifted celebrates the gifted people who made the art, and the gifted collectors with an eye for art who generously gave their art to the museum. In addition, some donors have provided purchase funds, recognizing the museum’s need to buy the ...

The Houser/Haozous Family: Celebrating a Century

April 5, 2014 - April 24, 2016

The Heard pays homage to the birth of a child and a modern Indian nation through the art of an acclaimed family of artists. In 1914, the Chiricahua Apache people were released from their status as prisoners of war and given allotments of land in and around Fort Sill, Okla. The descendants of Sam and ...

Every Picture Tells a Story

September 9, 2002 - April 17, 2016

Explore seven regions and see how American Indian artists reflect their environments in their artwork in this interactive gallery perfect for families. Spot the different wildlife and vegetation illustrated in the artwork, then try your hand at making a hummingbird, bandolier bag, Northwest Coast button blanket, bow guard or Inuit felt design. It's fun for everyone!

Confluence: Inter-generational Collaborations

February 6, 2016 - April 17, 2016

This exhibit will consist of works co-created by seven pairs of American Indian artists from the greater Southwest region. Each pair consists of one established mentor artist and one emerging artist (age 16 to 20). Each partnership will involve the co-creation of a collaborative piece or series of pieces, depending on the medium. The exhibit ...

Las Favoritas de Frida: Selections from the Heard Collection

October 31, 2015 - March 27, 2016

What would Frida Kahlo wear? What kinds of folk art would she surround herself with? To answer those questions, the Heard went to the Phoenix Fridas. This collective of nine artists founded a decade ago draw inspiration by Frida Kahlo’s life, work and attitude toward life. The Fridas worked with the Heard to select items from the ...

We Are! Arizona’s First People

July 1, 2005 - March 16, 2016

Located in the Ullman Learning Center, this exhibit is the only gallery display in the state to include all 22 of Arizona’s federally recognized tribal communities. In their own voices, Arizona’s Native cultures explain their histories, cultures and futures. Children and kids-at-heart will love the interactive and hands-on take-home activities.

Frida Kahlo—Her Photos

October 31, 2015 - February 8, 2016

A selection of 240 photos from the Blue House archive in Mexico City will be exhibited at the Heard Museum, curated by acknowledged Mexican photographer and photo historian, Pablo Ortiz Monasterio. Frida Kahlo’s photographs served as work tools, as memories and a means to exorcise solitude. Kahlo’s biography and exhibit shows the importance of this medium in her life.

Beautiful Games: American Indian Sport and Art

December 20, 2014 - November 29, 2015

Sports have played a pivotal role in American Indian tribal communities; in fact, many contemporary sports are rooted in traditional tribal sporting games. Lacrosse and surfing have long been attributed to indigenous peoples, while other games such as cross-country running, racquetball, cross-country skiing and canoeing, although not exclusive to the Americas, evolved independently. Native athletes ...

Loloma: Expressions in Metal, Ink and Clay

February 28, 2015 - October 4, 2015

Few know that, in addition to being one of Native America’s most beloved and acclaimed jewelers, Charles Loloma (Hopi) also created beautiful pen and ink drawings of landscapes, textiles and corn, among other inspirations. The exhibit will offer fresh insights into the talents of this leading Native artist. Loloma’s drawings echo his design esthetic for ...

Time Exposures: Picturing a History of Isleta Pueblo in the 19th Century

January 31, 2015 - September 27, 2015

In this exhibit, the people of Isleta Pueblo in New Mexico tell their own story — their history and the lasting effects of 19th century changes on their lives today. Using many historic photographs and a variety of media, the story unfolds in three parts: First, the people describe the cycle of the traditional year as ...